11.12.2004

I dream of algebra...

When the boys woke up around 2:00 this morning, Andy was a bit frustrated at their inability to graph a certain equation.

Speaking of fish, Mr. Wugger's new favorite pastime is gnawing on a bright multi-colored plastic fish. (Rainbow trout?) We just need to be careful to limit him to 3 servings a week, due to mercury content....

But what constitutes a proper serving size for plastic fish?

7 comments:

slowlane said...

At least you are instilling in him the ecological value of catch and release fishing.

Elena said...

What exactly is the ecological value of catch and release fishing? Are fish fishier once caught?

Perhaps the fish that are caught and released are then able to spread lots of warnings to the fish who otherwise might get caught by less environmentally friendly fishermen?

In that case, catch-and-release is a dastardly sneaky plot to sabotage the fishing industry, while the purpetrators disguise themselves as fellow fishermen.

This is all exceedingly disturbing.

slowlane said...

I will illustrate the ecological aspect of catch and release fishing through the following scenarios.

1) Mr. Fisherman goes fishing and catches his limit of fish and returns home where he cleans them and stores them to make many meals.

2) Mr. Fisherman goes fishing and catches his limit of fish which he then burries so that he can make up stories about the size of the fish that he caught.

3) Mr. Fisherman goes fishing and wants to spend all day fishing and so he releases every fish he catches so that he doesn't ever reach his limit, as he doesn't particularly like eating fish to begin with.

4) Mr. Fisherman goes fishing and spends all day, never catching anything but used tires (which he releases) and throwing empty beer cans into the water.

In these scenarios, numbers one and three are ecologically sound, numbers two and four are not.

Elena said...

So the moral of the story is make sure you use the right bait so you catch fish instead of tires and beer cans.

And tell fish stories about "the one you threw back in," not "the one that I buried."

There's a parable in here somewhere...

Elena said...

What do we do with scenario number 4, where said fisherman catches a fish, gnaws on it for a while, examines it thoroughly, bangs it against the couch, and THEN releases it?

slowlane said...

We call PETA.

Elena said...

slowlane, my mother says to tell you that burying fish is quite environmentally sound as long as you plant corn on top of them.