4.08.2007



I'm looking forward to sitting down with a cup of coffee in our brand new study after the kids are in bed, and figuring this one out with Andy.

It's what nerds do on dates.

Well, broke nerds, anyway.

=)

2 comments:

Emily said...

Weird. Let me know if you guys figure it out, ok? And would it be a helpful way to teach students multiplication, or just a strange and fun side project?

Elena said...

Turns out, it's exactly the same thing as the normal method of long multiplication (what do you call that, anyway?) only visually organized.

The intersections of the hundreds of both numbers are each worth 10,000. The intersections of the hundreds place of the first number and the tens place of the second number are each worth 1,000, as are the intersections of the tens place of the first and the hundreds place of the second. The intersections of the tens places of both are worth 100 each, and so are the intersections of the hundreds and the ones. The tens and ones are worth 10, and the ones and ones are worth... one.

Not sure if that made any sense at all. Rather hard to type about. =)

But it really did help me understand the ideas behind that oh-so-familiar rote operation.

And it turned it into a very pretty pattern, too!

I like mathematical prettiness!